​Catrina Long

An artist out of Knoxville, Tennessee, Catrina Long began creating art as a child. It all began in the kitchen where she watched her mother cook meals for her and her two brothers by day. That same kitchen instantly doubled as studio space for her mother to create fashions by night. "I was always amazed at how quickly my mother would clean the kitchen floor to create a clean surface to cut out fabrics. Red, blue, black, white, floral, paisley, leather, and denim: I was drawn to the various textiles she used to adorn the bodies of her clients. My mother inspired me. She taught me how to pay attention to details and the behaviors the fabric would take on on different body types. These were the first steps in beginning to train my eye to see." With this in mind, Catrina began creating paper dolls. "Making paper dolls was totally functional to me. Not only did it allow me to be creative as an artist, it created an avenue for me to play. Barbies were cool. They were super cool actually, but I didn't make my barbies. I wanted something I could call my own."



An artist out of Knoxville, Tennessee, Catrina Long began creating art as a child. It all began in the kitchen where she watched her mother cook meals for her and her two brothers by day. That same kitchen instantly doubled as studio space for her mother to create fashions by night. "I was always amazed at how quickly my mother would clean the kitchen floor to create a clean surface to cut out fabrics. Red, blue, black, white, floral, paisley, leather, and denim: I was drawn to the various textiles she used to adorn the bodies of her clients. My mother inspired me. She taught me how to pay attention to details and the behaviors the fabric would take on on different body types. These were the first steps in beginning to train my eye to see." With this in mind, Catrina began creating paper dolls. "Making paper dolls was totally functional to me. Not only did it allow me to be creative as an artist, it created an avenue for me to play. Barbies were cool. They were super cool actually, but I didn't make my barbies. I wanted something I could call my own."



Catrina began her studies in drawing at the University of Tennessee. Determined to be well versed, she entered the Art Education program at the University. She received her Masters of Science in Art Teacher Education along with her Bachelors in Fine Arts with a concentration in Painting at the University. "I started out with an interest in drawing. I passed both drawing and painting portfolio in the same semester, but painting allowed me to pursue my studies in Art Education as well. I learned a lot through the painting program. Michael Braake and Tom Riesing were two phenomenal Professors who believed in me. I never even thought that I was a painter until I met these guys. I love to paint, but I'm getting back to my roots. I absolutely, positively, have a crazed obsession with drawing!"​

Catrina is currently working on her drawings looking to venture out. She observes the people around her whether it's at the local coffee shop, open mic nights, or taking walks around town. Her inspiration comes from the "Average Joes" she encounters. "A person's demeanor, how they carry themselves, the clothes that they wear all catch my eye. No matter how normal a person may seem, I always see the quirk in them that makes them special." Her daily motivation is her son. "My son keeps me on my toes. He's very bright with an expansive vocabulary. Yes, I am bragging! I'm one proud mom. When he tells me that I'm the best mommy, I give him a hug and kiss and tell him that I love him, and then, I clean my kitchen floor and begin my artist duties."